Prisons for our bodies closet for our minds by patricia hill collins

Collins uses the prisoner as a metaphor for the dehumanization of poor Black people, in our society.

There are many problems with viewing racism and heterosexism as two separate systems of power. Homosexuality within Black culture has been so suppressed in the past.

Black Sexual Politics : African Americans, Gender and the New Racism.

The reason we think this way is because of the binaries used to categorize people. So, racial and sexual normality is reliant on the negative stigmatization of Black sexuality and of homosexuality, in order to have meaning.

It was more often discussed as a threat specifically to the White, nuclear family, structure. They perpetuate sexual violence, unjust convictions, and hinder the lives of African Americans, no matter what their sexuality. It was as a mechanism to dehumanize them, and use them as slaves.

So heterosexism is a system Black people have always wanted to maintain, in order to be accepted by White people.

Collins believes that the two rely on each other for meaning, and neither makes sense without the other. Overall, Patricia Hill Collins is right, the ideologies that support racism and heterosexism have become hegemonic knowledge, that no one wants to question.

As a result Black masculinity within these neighborhoods is often seen as overly aggressive or criminal. When ideas about heterosexism or racism become naturalized by people, then they become hegemonic. As well they need to understand how the roles of sexuality and gender are reinforcing the oppression that is already embedded within Black Culture.

Using prison as a metaphor for racism and the closet to represent homophobia, Collins proves that both systems affect our daily lives. Since the end of the Civil War era African American communities have been institutionally and geographically segregated from White communities.

Therefore it is completely supported by the institutional bases of or society. Of course, it does exist within Black culture, but in the past African Americans we stigmatized by Whites as sexually promiscuous. Within the inner city neighborhoods and urban ghettos, Black people are subjugated, and humiliated, by outsiders and by the police.DISCUSSION QUESTIONS PRISONS FOR OUR BODIES, CLOSETS FOR OUR MINDS RBQDIES Patricia Hill Collins, "Prisons for Our Bodies, Closets for Our Minds" from Black Sexual Politics.

cally taise questIons a THE CLOSET much ear let an d/ot more forcefully and hererosexlsm. "Prisons for Our Bodies, Closets for Our Minds: Racism, Heterosexism, and Black Sexuality " Patricia Hill Collins "The Combahee River.

- Patricia Hill Collins "Prisons for Our Bodies, Closets for Our Minds: Racism, Heterosexism, and Black Sexuality" This is a term used to describe a societal "norm" concerning sexual orientation.

Since the United States is built on Christianity, it is implied that the "norm" for sexual orientation is heterosexual. Patricia Hill Collins: “Prisons for our Bodies; Closets for our Minds” Examines intersection of race and sexuality Prison as metaphor for racial discrimination Closet as metaphor for sexuality discrimination They are not separate (both controlled by institutions, discipline) Intersection: the racialization of promiscuity; the whitening of.

Cherry Bomb Wednesday, November 20, Response to Prisons for Our Bodies, Closets for Our Minds.

Patricia Hill Collins’ essay outlines the problems with viewing racism and heterosexism as two separate systems of power and oppression. She believes that these ideas have been institutionalized and naturalized in order to maintain and.

Aug 11,  · Week 3 Response: Patricia Hill Collins, “Prisons for Our Bodies, Closets for Our Minds: Racism, Heterosexism, and Black Sexuality” The author brings out some really disturbing instances of our times.

Although it was not a famous incident, it really makes me question my surroundings.

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Prisons for our bodies closet for our minds by patricia hill collins
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